Home Health Care Franchises Prospering in 2012

Baby boomers are aging, and the senior citizen population is predicted to reach 49 million by the end of the year. Any business involving the interests of and care of the aging generation are becoming more lucrative every year. Franchisers see huge opportunity in the aging population.
Problems with social security, Medicare and Medicaid are all causing seniors to look elsewhere for healthcare. In addition many of them prefer to stay home and avoid hospitals. An appealing option for many senior citizens is home health care, and franchisers are capitalizing on this growing market. The home heath care franchise industry is flourishing.
According to statistics from FRANdata, between 2006 and 2008 the home health care franchise industry grew by 13% each year. If you are considering opening a home health care franchise there are tons of options, and no one company has dominance in the market.
Franchising can be a lucrative way to become involved in small business. With a senior citizen population that is growing each day, and with the current health care crisis, the home health care franchise industry is thriving. If you are looking into franchising be aware of the profitable options in home health care.
Lee Thomas
“Helping People into the RIGHT Business/Franchise for THEIR SUCCESS
Franchise Paths to Success a dba of
Integrity Business Ventures, Inc.
888 701 6413
www.franchisepathstosuccess.com
Lee@myFPTS.com

Important Things to Consider When Choosing a Franchise


Are you considering buying a franchise? Before you sign up to run a fast-food joint or a convenience store, you might want to consider the many, many franchise opportunities that exist today. There are a whole host of franchises that are off the beaten path—everything from organic gardening to furniture repair. Odds are that one of them will fit your tastes and your budget.

There are several benefits to owning a franchise, including backup support and a clear business plan that’s already been proven to work. Here are the key things to consider if you’re thinking of buying a franchise.

Do you need experience?

“The key to a successful franchise, whether it is a traditional one or more of a niche opportunity, is to understand the marketplace and have good business acumen,” said Tom Wood, president and chief executive officer of Floor Covering International, in Norcross, Georgia.

You don’t need to be a flooring expert to get involved in the franchise, which is the case with many franchises, Wood said.

“In fact, we strongly prefer that our franchisees don’t have experience in the flooring industry,” he said. “We want franchisees who understand the art of marketing and the need for sales. We want franchisees who are focused on customer service and ways to increase transactions. Good quality franchisees are hard to come by.”

How is the market changing?

Franchise opportunities often emerge as the result of changing consumer tastes. Because franchises have professional marketing and planning departments, they can react quickly and effectively to changing consumer trends.

“When we started out, ‘green’ and ‘organic’ were not the buzzwords they are today,” said Karen Cancilla, founder and CEO of “groOrganic”. The company offers franchises that involve installing and maintaining organic vegetable gardens in backyards, schools, health care facilities and businesses and providing educational programs and high-quality organic products. “It is a small target, but it is growing like crazy,” she said.

Is there a need for your franchise?

Before choosing a franchise, it’s important to assess whether there is a real need for what your company will be offering.

Todd Gerry, president of  Tradebank International Franchising Corp., the franchising arm of Tradebank International, said his franchise business focuses on an alternative payment option — barter — something which is gaining interest in a down economy, especially among small business owners looking to swap their products or services for things they need through a barter network.

“Barter and other alternative payment methods are hot-button issues for business owners looking to reduce their expenses while increasing their profit margins,” he said.

Does the franchise offer support?

Because unconventional franchises focus on unusual products and services, training and support is important.

“We have accountants, lawyers, IT professionals and all kinds of people who get into this business,” said Al Crnjac, who just signed on for a fourth Fibrenew franchise in Eastern Ontario. The franchise, which is based in Calgary, Alberta, specializes in leather, vinyl, plastic and cloth repair. “The training is excellent and there is an online library that is always available as a reference.”

Is the business recession-proof?

Before choosing a franchise, it’s important to consider whether the business can ride out rough economic times. The answer may not always be obvious.

“We are a full-service staffing franchise, offering permanent and temporary staffing services and employment solutions, including evaluation hire, temporary staffing, professional search and human resources,” said Dan Gunderson, franchising executive for Express Employment. “Staffing and HR are areas where there is always a need, no matter what the economy,” he said. “Even if companies are not hiring full-time workers, they are looking for temporary or contract employees to fill the gaps and they need help with human resources issues.”

Lee Thomas

“Helping People into the RIGHT Business/Franchise for THEIR SUCCESS

Franchise Paths to Success a dba of

Integrity Business Ventures, Inc.

888 701 6413

www.franchisepathstosuccess.com

Lee@myFPTS.com

Three reasons to reach out when the going gets tough

Three reasons to reach out when the going gets tough
It’s not natural to reach out when your business is struggling. But that’s exactly when you need to do it the most. Here are three ways a coffee can boost your business.
Running a small business is like riding a gigantic roller coaster. Sometimes you just want to close your eyes and scream.
When you’re on a steep downhill — when the cash in your bank account is plummeting just as you need to make payroll — the natural human instinct is to pull in, like a tortoise. We want to hide from the world in the safety of a hard shell that could pass for a rock.
But one of the best pieces of advice that I have ever received came from an accomplished and brilliant entrepreneur, just as I was going through a particularly rough patch: Do not become disconnected. Reach out to others.
Fine. What normal person reaches out to others when they feel like crap?
Here are three good reasons to fight your tortoise tendencies when your business hits bottom:
• You (and your team) may be in a rut. Entrepreneurs focus, drive hard and hold themselves to high standards. The flip side is that we can be our own toughest critics and run our teams ragged. Before you know it, everyone has lost their mojo. An outside voice can reset this parasitic dynamic and reignite the team. A new person may have some positive insights into the business’ strengths, constructive suggestions, or new areas or opportunities to think about. Either way, an outsider can break the stalemate of group think.
• Your next big opportunity could be a coffee away. The truth is that you never know where your best leads are going to come from, period. This is particularly counterintuitive for the analytically minded, high-tech entrepreneurs of my world. We think our leads will come from people who are as well-versed as we are in our specialized technology areas, replete with acronyms no one else understands. Wrong, wrong, wrong. How wrong? After attending a seminar by author Debra Fine, I got a terrific lead on a customer needing some very specialized optical scanning technology – right up our alley — for a fellow entrepreneur in…the furniture business. Corporate furniture. Go figure.
• The world is not going to wait for you. Hiding in your office is not a winning strategy for unearthing new trends. Get out and see what is going on. Some areas of business are being turned on their heads. That’s a frightening prospect for incumbents. But these trends also present enormous opportunities that entrepreneurs can’t afford to miss.
Right now, I am seeing a tectonic shift in the business of manufacturing equipment, the kind that cranks out your beloved iPhones and iPads. In the “old days” of equipment, only big companies were players. It was a highly capital-intensive business with expectations of instant worldwide support. Then the other day, I saw a manufacturing system the size of a modest house, financed by a manufacturing company in China, and entirely designed and built by a network of small businesses in Silicon Valley. The system will be shipped to China in large containers and reassembled there. The value is in the design. The big infrastructure, cash reserves, and support of the big companies is not valued by the customer. It’s a huge opportunity for small companies, especially those that know how to collaborate.
The next time you are feeling down, fight against your instincts, and text a fellow entrepreneur. Coffee? Tea? If things are really tough, maybe you need something stronger. Just get out of your shell.
Article by Laura Smoliar,
Lee Thomas
“Helping People into the RIGHT Business/Franchise for THEIR SUCCESS
Franchise Paths to Success a dba of
Integrity Business Ventures, Inc.
888 701 6413
www.franchisepathstosuccess.com
Lee@myFPTS.com

BEST FRANCHISE CATEGORIES FOR 2012

After three straight years of decline, the number of franchise units are projected to increase 1.9% in 2012, as jobs at franchises increase 2.1% and total revenues increase 5% to $782 billion, according to “The Franchise Business: Economic Outlook 2012,” prepared by IHS Global Insight.
The report should be of interest not only to existing franchise owners but those considering buying a franchise or looking for a growth industry in which to apply for a job.
“We estimate that franchise businesses account for 3.0% of GDP in nominal dollars,” the report says. It projects real U.S. GDP will grow 1.8% in 2021, up a tick from the 1.7% estimated growth for all of 2011.
According to IHS, personal services such as health care and education will have the fastest growing revenues of 10 major franchise sectors in 2012 growing 6.2% to almost $88 billion.
The sector expected to see the greatest percentage growth in number of franchised units is lodging – hotels and motels – at 3.1% to almost 25,600 units. “We expect continued modest gains in consumer travel and spending on lodging,” the report says.
Quick service restaurants will remain the largest sector in revenues ($201 billion in 2012), number of units (151,000) and jobs (3 million), but percentage growth will lag, according to IHS. “Higher food prices helped push up nominal sales in 2011. With employment and income improving slowing through 2012, we would expect quick service restaurants to more than hold their own when compared to the rest of the market.”
In 2012, IHS forecasts that total revenue taken in by franchised businesses will break down by sector:
• Quick service restaurants 26%
• Business services 19%
• Personal services 11%
• Lodging 10%
• Full-service restaurants 7%
• Commercial and Residential Services 6%
• Real estate 6%
• Retail products and services 5%
• Retail food 5%
• Automotive 5%
Although the economy has improved recently, HIS expects growth to slow again in the first half of 2012 because households and governments are still struggling with high debt. Because of that expectation, it forecasts only modest growth in employment and total revenues for the franchise industry in 2012.
Lee Thomas
“Helping People into the RIGHT Business/Franchise for THEIR SUCCESS
Franchise Paths to Success a dba of
Integrity Business Ventures, Inc.
888 701 6413
www.franchisepathstosuccess.com
Lee@myFPTS.com